HAMILTON, Bermuda, Tuesday November 7, 2017 – The 17th named storm of the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season has formed off the small Caribbean island of Bermuda.

But forecasters say Tropical Storm Rina will not threaten any land areas as it tracks into the northern Atlantic Ocean in the days ahead.

The system was about 890 east of Bermuda when it developed into a storm last night.

At 11 a.m. today, Rina, carrying maximum sustained winds near 40 miles per hour, was located about 905 miles east of Bermuda and was moving towards the north at 15 miles per hour.

Forecasters say that general motion, accompanied by an increase in forward speed, is expected through tonight, and Tropical Storm Rina is expected to move even more quickly toward the north-northeast by tomorrow night.

Some strengthening is also forecast during the next 48 hours.

However, Rina is unlikely to become a hurricane as it enters the cooler waters of the northern Atlantic Ocean and merges with a cold front midweek, which will transition it into a post-tropical low-pressure system.

According to the Weather Channel, Rina is the first “R” storm to form as late in the Atlantic hurricane season as November.

The ‘R’ storm has only been named in the Atlantic five other times since 1950, when formal hurricane names started being used. This occurred in 2012 (Rafael), 2011 (Rina – yep, same name), 2010 (Richard), 2005 (Rita) and 1995 (Roxanne).

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